http://creepyyeha.tumblr.com/post/95602612140/i-never-listen-to-nicki-minaj-music-until-i-saw

creepyyeha:

I never listen to Nicki Minaj music until I saw her latest video today and I feel sick. Not because of all the butts ( i love butts ) but because of her lyrics. Fuck skinny bitches? Now I’m not familiar with her work or what she stands for but I have always had the impression that she represented…

😏😏😏😏

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blackfashion:


Bane, 18, Willamsburg
http://b4sic-me.tumblr.com/
Instagram: @b4sic_me

blackfashion:

Bane, 18, Willamsburg

http://b4sic-me.tumblr.com/

Instagram: @b4sic_me

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

(Source: thekimichiblog, via purethots)

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christinefriar:

I. love. the. Anaconda. video. but the writeups I’ve been seeing keep referring to Drake as a co-star, which I think misses a big part of the point.

The reason this video rules is because Drake is an extra. Drake is a prop. Drake is a bro in the comfy-casual clothes that he rolled up to the set in, who has no lines or purpose other than the be ground upon, and whose face is obscured by shadows most of the time.

This is not a continuation of the Drake/Nicki/Rih media narrative. This is a dank-as-fuck feminist power play. This is, “Drake is whatever to me.” And this is a man who, if he isn’t at the top of his game, is close to it. A huge celebrity. And here is Nicki looking fucking amazing, tormenting him into a boner, then swatting his hand away and walking out of frame.

Your anaconda don’t want none unless she got buns, hun? Maybe she doesn’t want your anaconda. Maybe she’ll do whatever the fuck she wants with her buns, and it doesn’t matter what you think or feel.

(via marfmellow)

rexuality:

I hate being told to do something I was already planning on doing

like I was all about doing this task, and then you told me to do it and now i am annoyed and this task is now 300x less likely to be completed

(via mamashug)

tepitome:

Pan’s Labyrinth 
"Stephen King attended a screening of Pan’s Labyrinth and sat next to director Guillermo Del Toro. During the infamous Pale Man chase scene, King squirmed in his seat which Del Toro described as “the best experience ever”.

tepitome:

Pan’s Labyrinth 

"Stephen King attended a screening of Pan’s Labyrinth and sat next to director Guillermo Del Toro. During the infamous Pale Man chase scene, King squirmed in his seat which Del Toro described as “the best experience ever”.

(via queertobacco)

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

For the last line of the above comment - When no means force, we become afraid to say no.

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